The significance of the Higgs Boson discovery

Dr. Ellis, Maxwell Professor of theoretical physics at King's College London and Guest Professor at the European Organisation for Nuclear Research (CERN), joins the BOLDtalks 2013 platform to explain the significance of the particle recently discovered at CERN (thought to be the long-sought Higgs Boson) and what its discovery means for the future of science and understanding the fabric of the Universe. Dr. Ellis is a world expert in the fields of particle physics, astrophysics, cosmology and quantum gravity.

In particle physics, there is a theory called the ‘Standard Model’ that explains that the universe is completely comprised of matter (fermions) and force (bosons).

However, more than 50 years ago Peter Higgs and five other theoretical physicists proposed that an invisible field lying across the Universe gives particles their mass, allowing them to clump together to form stars and planets.

This theory has been unproved, until July 2012, when scientists from the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) have announced a breakthrough discovery of Higgs Boson, using the Large Hydron Collider (LHC) - the world’s largest particle accelerator.

Dr. Ellis, Maxwell Professor of theoretical physics at King's College London and Guest Professor at the European Organisation for Nuclear Research (CERN), joins the BOLDtalks 2013 platform to explain the significance of the particle recently discovered at CERN (thought to be the long-sought Higgs Boson) and what its discovery means for the future of science and understanding the fabric of the Universe. Dr. Ellis is a world expert in the fields of particle physics, astrophysics, cosmology and quantum gravity.

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